Research Archives

Sort by
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Dec 10, 2012

Pancreatic cancer drug improves lifespan

From: Arizona Republic

A new cancer drug combination demonstrated significant improvement in overall survival of late-stage pancreatic cancer patients compared to those receiving standard treatment, according to the results of a new trial led by physicians from Scottsdale Healthcare’s Virginia G. Cancer Center Clinical Trials and Translational Genomics Research Institute.

Read More: Cancer drug fares well in trial

Tags: abraxane, gemcitabine, pancreatic cancer, scottsdale healthcare, tgen, virginia g. cancer center clinical trial
Research_icon
Dec 10, 2012

Brains can change well before Alzheimer’s symptoms

From: New York Times

Newly-published research by Banner Alzheimer’s Institute reveals that the brain can begin to change at least 20 years before a person shows symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Read More: Alzheimer’s Precursors Evident in Brain at Early Age

Tags: alzheimer’s disease, banner alzheimer’s institute, eric reiman
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Research_icon
Jul 20, 2012

ASU wins $3 million grant to fight colorectal cancer

From the Phoenix Business Journal:

The National Cancer Institute has awarded a $3 million grant to the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University.

The money will be used to fund research to promote colorectal cancer screenings among underserved populations.

Tags: arizona state university, cancer, colorectal, grant, national cancer institute
Research_icon
Jan 03, 2012

Nature speaks with Keim about H5N1 studies

In Nature, Heidi Ledford speaks with pathogen-genomics expert Paul Keim of Northern Arizona University and TGen North about the controversial recommendation by the US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity--Keim chairs the panel--that Nature and Science censor papers on how to make the H5N1 avian flu virus more transmissible:

“We’re being accused of being the bad guys,” says Keim, based at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. “But most of what we’ve done is to push back against harsher regulations.” Since its inception, Keim says that the NSABB has only been asked to review six papers, including two in 2005 that described the reconstruction of the 1918 influenza virus that is thought to have killed more than 20 million people. In that case, the board recommended that the papers simply be amended to spell out the public-health benefits of the research.

[...]

In the course of its deliberations over the H5N1 papers, the NSABB became aware of additional work on H5N1 transmissibility that was nearing publication. Keim says the board is now considering whether to recommend a voluntary moratorium on the publication of such work until the community can discuss further precautions to prevent misuse. He expects the board to vote on this in the next few weeks, and adds: “It is time for us to have a broad and global discussion.”

Read more: "Call to censor flu studies draws fire"

Tags: h5n1, northern arizona university, paul keim, tgen north
Research_icon
Nov 12, 2011

CSS Institute for Advanced Health signs data-center partner

The Chan Soon-Shiong Institute for Advanced Health, which announced earlier this year that it would establish headquarters in Phoenix, has, with NantWorks LLC and National LambdaRail, selected IO, "the leading provider of next-generation modular data center technology and services," to support the giant data center that the CSS Institute is establishing in Phoenix.

"Now, for the first time, we are able to bring together a high-performance communications network, dedicated storage capacity and high-performance computing," said Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, Chairman of the CSS Institute, NantWorks and the NLR. "This is the infrastructure that we have so far lacked for healthcare, and which is vital to translate genomic data into actionable clinical decision making. It is the beginning of 21st century medicine."

"In addition to generating massive volumes of information requiring high-performance IT, the regulatory environment of the healthcare ecosystem also requires a highly protected and reliable infrastructure," said Anthony J. D'Ambrosi, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer. "IO's high-density and ultra-secure infrastructure enables healthcare IT to accomplish their goals both today and into the future."

Read more: "IO Announces Contract with the Chan Soon-Shiong Institute for Advanced Health, NantWorks LLC and National LambdaRail"

Tags: css institute for advanced health, io, national lambdarail, patrick soon-shiong
Research_icon
Jun 20, 2011

Promising skin-cancer drug nears approval

A promising new drug to treat advanced basal-cell skin cancer is inching closer to FDA approval. The treatment, guided through the development process by Daniel Von Hoff, TGen's physician in chief, would mark a major milestone for Arizona bioscience leaders:

The drug, called GDC-0449, is expected to receive Food and Drug Administration approval this fall. The drug began testing in 2008 at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials in Scottsdale, a partnership between the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare.

It would be the first drug connected to either institution to receive FDA approval.

[...]

"It's the reason everyone exists and works to help somebody," said Von Hoff, who also serves as chief scientific officer at Scottsdale Healthcare and US Oncology. "Everybody involved with this is very proud. And if it's done once, you can do it again."

Perhaps as exciting, the mechanism the drug targets, the "Hedgehog" pathway, may provide a target for a more widely dreaded cancer:

Scottsdale is in the early stages of testing the safety and effectiveness of GDC-0449 for treatment of other forms of cancer, including pancreatic.

Read more at the source: "Scottsdale-tested 'miracle' cancer drug awaits FDA approval"

Tags: daniel von hoff, scottsdale healthcare, tgen
Research_icon
Mar 17, 2011

Collaboration between ASU, Mayo supported by BioAccel

Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic are developing a new device that could put an end to the painful finger pricking that patients with diabetes must endure on a daily basis.

The project, funded first by a seed grant from Mayo Clinic, now also has support from BioAccel, an Arizona-based nonprofit organization focused on accelerating the commercialization of bioscience technology.

The new sensor would enable people to draw tear fluid from their eyes to get a glucose-level test sample.

Glucose in tear fluid may give an indication of glucose levels in the blood as accurately as a test using a blood sample, the researchers say.

“The problem with current self-monitoring blood glucose technologies is not so much the sensor," says Jeffrey T. LaBelle, a bioengineer. "It’s the painful finger prick that makes people reluctant to perform the test. This new technology might encourage patients to check their blood sugars more often, which could lead to better control of their diabetes by a simple touch to the eye."

LaBelle, the designer of the device technology, is a research professor in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. He is leading the ASU-Mayo research team along with Mayo Clinic physicians Curtiss B. Cook, an endocrinologist, and Dharmendra (Dave) Patel, chair of Mayo’s Department of Surgical Ophthalmology. The team reported on their early work on the sensor in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology last year and at various regional and national conferences.

[...]

“With funding provided by BioAccel, the research team will conduct critical experiments to determine how well the new device correlates with use of the current technology that uses blood sampling,” says Ron King, BioAccel’s chief scientific and business officer.

The results should help efforts to secure downstream funding for further development work from such sources as the National Institutes of Health and the Small Business Incentive Research Program, King says.

Read more at the source: "ASU, Mayo Clinic team work to help diabetes patients"

Tags: arizona state university, bioaccel, diabetes, mayo clinic
Research_icon
Mar 09, 2011

PBS-Bio identifies mechanism for cancer drug candidate's effectiveness

Predictive Biomarker Sciences, a Mesa-based firm, has concluded a study that explains how a drug candidate developed by the Brussels-based firm Unibioscreen kills cancer.

Previous studies have shown that over-activity of a gene known as MCL1 can cause cancer cells to grow out of control. PBS-Bio, which is owned in part by the non-profit, Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), co-discovered that UNBS1450 effectively shuts off the gene and induces apoptosis, the cancer cell’s normal process of cellular death.

“It’s a very nice candidate drug,” said Dr. Michael Bittner, a biologist and Principal Investigator of the PBS-Bio technology. Dr. Bittner said UNBS1450 is effective against MCL1 in very low dosages, which means it could potentially be delivered to patients with minimal side effects and low toxicity. MCL1 is prevalent in leukemia, non-small-cell lung cancer, as well as cancers of the prostate and pancreas.

“The presence of MCL1 can be used as a stratification, or predictive, biomarker to help determine which cancer patients are most likely to respond to UNBS1450,” said Dr. Edward Smith, co-founder and CEO of PBS-Bio. This would be particularly beneficial, Dr. Smith said, in selecting patients to participate in clinical trials of UNBS1450, and ultimately in helping physicians decide who should be placed on the drug once it is approved for general use.

Read more at the source: "PBS-Bio uncovers how Unibioscreen drug kills cancer"

Tags: predictive biomarker sciences, tgen
Research_icon
Feb 16, 2011

TGen, Mayo sequence pancreatic cancer tumor

[From the Arizona Republic]

Ken Alltucker of the Republic reports on an important project that the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the Mayo Clinic (Scottsdale) have completed: sequencing the genome of a pancreatic cancer tumor--quickly.

Doctors and scientists have talked about the prospect of tailored medical treatments based on an individual's DNA since the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. Yet the technology has provided few practical tools for doctors as they provide care for patients facing life-threatening disease.

"We were impressed with the technology," said Keith Stewart, Mayo Clinic's dean of research. "What we couldn't figure out is how we would make this clinically applicable for the future."

The extraction and sequencing took 6 weeks, and cost an estimated $150,000. But given the expense of many cancer-fighting drugs, and the potential for sequencing costs to continue falling, TGen and Mayo are already closing in on a clinical viability.

John Carpten, director of TGen's cancer-genomics division, said that the cost of such DNA sequencing should be compared to existing chemotherapy drugs. Such cancer drugs may cost as much as $60,000 to $70,000 per round, and patients often must endure multiple rounds of such therapies before they find one that is effective for them.

"What if you spend tens of thousands up front to try to figure out the right regimen to give patients?" Carpten said. "We are in the proof-of-principle stage. We have to prove to the medical establishment that providing this type of molecular detail is as or more beneficial (than current therapies). It is up to us to prove it."

Read more at the source: "DNA quickly mapped in study by Mayo Clinic, TGen"

Tags: mayo clinic, tgen